Dilruba Ahmed is the author Bring Now the Angels (Pitt Poetry Series, 2020), with poems featured in New York Times Magazine, The Slowdown, and Poetry Unbound with Pádraig Ó Tuama. Her debut book of poetry, Dhaka Dust (Graywolf Press, 2011), won the Bakeless Prize. Her poems have appeared in Kenyon Review, New England Review, and Ploughshares. Her poems have also been anthologized in The Best American Poetry 2019 (Scribner), Halal If You Hear Me (Haymarket Books), Literature: The Human Experience (Bedford/St. Martin’s), and elsewhere. Ahmed is the recipient of The Florida Review’s Editors’ Award, a Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Memorial Prize, and the Katharine Bakeless Nason Fellowship in Poetry awarded by the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. She has taught creative writing with Chatham University’s MFA Program, Hugo House in Seattle, and online with The Writing Lab. Website: www.dilrubaahmed.com/

is the author of two books of poetry, most recently Pilgrim Bell (Graywolf, 2021). The recipient of a Ruth Lilly Fellowship and many other awards, he was born in Tehran, Iran. He joined the Program faculty in 2018.

Lesley Nneka Arimah is the author of What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky, a collection of short stories from Riverhead Books. Her collection was named one of the best books of 2017 by NPR, The Guardian, The New Yorker, Publishers Weekly, Shelf Awareness, LitHub, and more. Her stories have been honored with a National Magazine Award, the Caine Prize, a Commonwealth Short Story Prize, and an O. Henry Award. Arimah’s work has appeared in The New YorkerHarper’sMcSweeney’s, and GRANTA among other publications, and has received support from The Elizabeth George Foundation, MacDowell, Breadloaf and others. What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky was selected for the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35 and won the 2017 Kirkus Prize, the 2018 New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award, and was selected for the New York Times/PBS book club among other honors. Arimah is a 2019 United States Artists Fellow in Writing. She lives in the Midwest and is working on a novel about you.

Mia Alvar is the author of the story collection In the Country, which won the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction, the University of Rochester’s Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize, and the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Award. Mia has been a writer in residence at Yaddo, the Djerassi Resident Artists Program, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and the Blue Mountain Center for the Arts; and has received fellowships from the Sewanee, Bread Loaf, and Sirenland Writers’ Conferences. Her work has appeared in The New York Times Book Review, One Story, The Missouri Review, the Cincinnati Review, and elsewhere. She has taught fiction at Columbia University’s School of the Arts, where she also received her MFA. Born in the Philippines and raised in Bahrain and New York, she lives in southern California.

Sally Ball is the author of three collections of poems, Hold Sway, Wreck Me and Annus Mirabilis. She has published essays and reviews in Lithub, NOR, Pleiades, The Review of Contemporary Fiction, The Volta, and elsewhere. Her poems have appeared in The American Poetry Review, Bennington Review, Boston Review (Forum 3), Harvard Review, Ploughshares, Tin House, Yale Review, and other magazines, as well as online at The Awl, Narrative, and Slate, and in The Best American Poetry anthology. Professor of English and director of creative writing at Arizona State University, Ball is also the associate director of Four Way Books. She has been with the press for 26 of its 30 years. She has received fellowships from the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, CAMAC Centre d’Art, and elsewhere. Her long poem HOLD has been made into an award-winning large-format artist’s book by the Czech printmaker Jan Vičar (2018); HOLD has been exhibited across Europe, in Japan, and in the US, and it will be the subject of an exhibition at the Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague this summer, sponsored the Czech Ministry of the Environment, as part of the handover of the EU presidency.

Andrea Barrett is the author of six novels and three story collections, most recently Archangel. She is the recipient of numerous honors, among them the National Book Award and a MacArthur Fellowship. Andrea teaches at Williams College and has taught in the Program since 1993.

Charles Baxter has published six novels, five story collections, a book of poetry, and two essay collections.  Recipient of numerous awards, he teaches at the University of Minnesota and has been on our faculty since 1987.

Oliver Baez Bendorf collaborates with language to imagine new possibilities for gender and nature. He’s received fellowships from the NEA, Vermont Studio Center, CantoMundo, and the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, and The Publishing Triangle’s Betty Berzon Award. His first book of poetry, The Spectral Wilderness, was selected by Mark Doty for the Stan and Tom Wick Poetry Prize and published by Kent State University Press. His second book, Advantages of Being Evergreen, won the Open Book Prize from Cleveland State University Poetry Center. His writing has appeared in, or is forthcoming from, Best American Poetry 2022, American Poetry Review, Denver Quarterly, The Nation, New England Review, Orion, POETRY Magazine, Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics, and elsewhere. Previously he’s taught in the undergraduate creative writing programs at University of Wisconsin-Madison and Kalamazoo College. He lives with his partner and rabbit in the Pacific Northwest.

Robert Boswell is the author of seven novels, three story collections, two plays, a cyberpunk novel, and two books of nonfiction. He has received National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Iowa School of Letters Award for Fiction, the PEN West Award for Fiction, the John Gassner Prize for Playwriting, and the Evil Companions Award. The Heyday of the Insensitive Bastards was a finalist for the 2010 PEN USA Literary Award in fiction. His stories have appeared in the New Yorker, Harper’s, Best American Short Stories, O. Henry Prize Stories, Pushcart Prize Stories, Esquire, Colorado Review, and many other magazines. Boswell teaches creative writing at the University of Houston, where he holds the Cullen Endowed Chair in Creative Writing, and in the Warren Wilson MFA Program.

Karen Brennan received her MFA from Goddard (the former Warren Wilson!) and her PhD from the University of Arizona. She is the author of three books of poems, Here on Earth, The Real Enough World and, most recently, little dark; three collections of short stories, Wild Desire, which won the AWP Award for Short Fiction in 1990, The Garden in Which I Walk and most recently, the hybrid collection, Monsters; and a memoir, Being With Rachel: A Personal Story of Memory and Survival. Her new hybrid prose poem/essay, Television, a memoir is forthcoming in 2022. A recipient of a National Endowment of the Arts Award, her essays, stories and poems have appeared in anthologies from Graywolf, Norton, Penguin, Spuytin Duyvil, Michigan, and Georgia among others. She is Professor of English Emerita from the University of Utah.