Dilruba Ahmed is the author Bring Now the Angels (Pitt Poetry Series, 2020), with poems featured in New York Times Magazine, The Slowdown, and Poetry Unbound with Pádraig Ó Tuama. Her debut book of poetry, Dhaka Dust (Graywolf Press, 2011), won the Bakeless Prize. Her poems have appeared in Kenyon Review, New England Review, and Ploughshares. Her poems have also been anthologized in The Best American Poetry 2019 (Scribner), Halal If You Hear Me (Haymarket Books), Literature: The Human Experience (Bedford/St. Martin’s), and elsewhere. Ahmed is the recipient of The Florida Review’s Editors’ Award, a Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Memorial Prize, and the Katharine Bakeless Nason Fellowship in Poetry awarded by the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. She has taught creative writing with Chatham University’s MFA Program, Hugo House in Seattle, and online with The Writing Lab. Website: www.dilrubaahmed.com/

is the author of two books of poetry, most recently Pilgrim Bell (Graywolf, 2021). The recipient of a Ruth Lilly Fellowship and many other awards, he was born in Tehran, Iran. He joined the Program faculty in 2018.

Dean Bakopoulos’ first novel, Please Don’t Come Back from the Moon (Harcourt, 2005), was a New York Times Notable Book; Bakopoulos co-wrote the film adaptation, which premiered last year at the Los Angeles Film Festival. His second novel, My American Unhappiness (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011) was named one of the year’s best novels by The Chicago Tribune, and his latest novel Summerlong (Ecco, 2015) made the independent bookstore bestseller list. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, Dean is now writer-in-residence at Grinnell College in Iowa, where he lives with his spouse, novelist Alissa Nutting, and their blended family of three kids. Dean and Alissa are now at work on a television series based on Alissa’s novel, Made For Love.

Andrea Barrett is the author of six novels and three story collections, most recently Archangel. She is the recipient of numerous honors, among them the National Book Award and a MacArthur Fellowship. Andrea teaches at Williams College and has taught in the Program since 1993.

Charles Baxter has published six novels, five story collections, a book of poetry, and two essay collections.  Recipient of numerous awards, he teaches at the University of Minnesota and has been on our faculty since 1987.

Marianne Boruch has published ten collections of poems including The Book of Hours (2011), Cadaver, Speak (2014), and Eventually One Dreams the Real Thing (2016), and most recently The Anti-Grief (2019) all from Copper Canyon Press. Her prose includes a memoir, The Glimpse Traveler (Indiana, 2011)and three essay collections, Poetry’s Old Air (Michigan’s “Poets on Poetry” series, 1993), In the Blue Pharmacy (Trinity, 2005), and The Little Death of Self (again that Michigan series, 2017).  Her poems and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, Paris Review, The Nation, Poetry London, American Poetry Review, Narrative, The London Review of Books, Field, Poetry, The New York Review of Books and elsewhere, and she’s been given the Kingsley-Tufts Poetry Award for The Book of Hours, four Pushcart Prizes, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center, as well as stints as artist-in-residence at two national parks, Isle Royale and Denali. She was a Fulbright/visiting professor in the UK at the University of Edinburgh in 2012, and in 2019, a Senior Fulbright Research Scholar at the University of Canberra in Australia, closely observing the astonishing wildlife there. Having taught for the last 34 years at Purdue University, she has now gone rogue and emeritus.

Jamel Brinkley is the author of A Lucky Man, finalist for the National Book Award and winner of the PEN Oakland Prize and the Ernest J Gaines Prize for Literary Excellence. He is currently a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University.

Liam Callanan’s newest novel, Paris by the Book, was a national bestseller and has been translated into German, Italian and Chinese. His story collection, Listen & Other Stories won George W. Hunt, SJ Prize in Arts & Letters, and his novel The Cloud Atlas was a finalist for the Edgar Award. He’s written for Slate, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and about chasing children’s books (in France and Greece) for the Wall Street Journal. Liam’s also the founder and executive producer of the nationwide Poetry Everywhere animated film project (poetryeverywhere.org). He teaches in the English department at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he was previously department chair and director of its doctoral program in creative writing. He earned an MFA from George Mason University, an MA at Georgetown and a BA at Yale.

Gabrielle Calvocoressi is the author of The Last Time I Saw Amelia EarhartApocalyptic Swing, which was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and Rocket Fantastic. She is the recipient of numerous grants and fellowships including a Stegner Fellowship and Jones Lectureship from Stanford University, a Rona Jaffe Woman Writers Award, and residences from Civitella di Ranieri and the Lannan Foundation. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in American Poetry ReviewPloughsharesThe New York TimesBoston Review and New England Review, among others. She is Senior Poetry Editor at Los Angeles Review of Books and Founder and Senior Curator at Voluble, a forthcoming channel from Los Angeles Review of Books. She teaches in the Warren Wilson Program for Writers and at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She makes new economies with those who wish to. She tweets at @rocketfantastic and is on Instagram as gabbat. She is at work on a memoir entitled The Year I Didn’t Kill Myself.

Maud Casey is the author of three novels, most recently The Man Who Walked Away, and a short story collection, Drastic. Recipient of the Italo Calvino Prize and a Guggenheim Fellowship, she teaches at the University of Maryland and has taught in our program since 2007.