Dilruba Ahmed is the author Bring Now the Angels (Pitt Poetry Series, 2020), with poems featured in New York Times Magazine, The Slowdown, and Poetry Unbound with Pádraig Ó Tuama. Her debut book of poetry, Dhaka Dust (Graywolf Press, 2011), won the Bakeless Prize. Her poems have appeared in Kenyon Review, New England Review, and Ploughshares. Her poems have also been anthologized in The Best American Poetry 2019 (Scribner), Halal If You Hear Me (Haymarket Books), Literature: The Human Experience (Bedford/St. Martin’s), and elsewhere. Ahmed is the recipient of The Florida Review’s Editors’ Award, a Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Memorial Prize, and the Katharine Bakeless Nason Fellowship in Poetry awarded by the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. She has taught creative writing with Chatham University’s MFA Program, Hugo House in Seattle, and online with The Writing Lab. Website: www.dilrubaahmed.com/

is the author of two books of poetry, most recently Pilgrim Bell (Graywolf, 2021). The recipient of a Ruth Lilly Fellowship and many other awards, he was born in Tehran, Iran. He joined the Program faculty in 2018.

Debra Allbery received her MFA from the University of Iowa and her MA from the University of Virginia. Her first collection of poetry, Walking Distance, won the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize and was published by the University of Pittsburgh Press. Her collection, Fimbul-Winter, was published by Four Way Books in October 2010 and won the Grub Street National Book Prize in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry, Yale Review, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, New England Review, The Nation, FIELD, TriQuarterly, and elsewhere. She has twice received fellowships from the NEA; other awards include the “Discovery”/The Nation Award, a Hawthornden fellowship, and two grants from the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts. She has taught writing and literature at Phillips Exeter Academy, Interlochen Arts Academy, Randolph College, Dickinson College, and the University of Michigan. Deb first taught in the Program in 1995; she became the director in June 2009.

Dean Bakopoulos’ first novel, Please Don’t Come Back from the Moon (Harcourt, 2005), was a New York Times Notable Book; Bakopoulos co-wrote the film adaptation, which premiered last year at the Los Angeles Film Festival. His second novel, My American Unhappiness (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011) was named one of the year’s best novels by The Chicago Tribune, and his latest novel Summerlong (Ecco, 2015) made the independent bookstore bestseller list. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, Dean is now writer-in-residence at Grinnell College in Iowa, where he lives with his spouse, novelist Alissa Nutting, and their blended family of three kids. Dean and Alissa are now at work on a television series based on Alissa’s novel, Made For Love.

Liam Callanan’s newest novel, Paris by the Book, was a national bestseller and has been translated into German, Italian and Chinese. His story collection, Listen & Other Stories won George W. Hunt, SJ Prize in Arts & Letters, and his novel The Cloud Atlas was a finalist for the Edgar Award. He’s written for Slate, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and about chasing children’s books (in France and Greece) for the Wall Street Journal. Liam’s also the founder and executive producer of the nationwide Poetry Everywhere animated film project (poetryeverywhere.org). He teaches in the English department at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he was previously department chair and director of its doctoral program in creative writing. He earned an MFA from George Mason University, an MA at Georgetown and a BA at Yale.

Gabrielle Calvocoressi is the author of The Last Time I Saw Amelia EarhartApocalyptic Swing, which was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and Rocket Fantastic. She is the recipient of numerous grants and fellowships including a Stegner Fellowship and Jones Lectureship from Stanford University, a Rona Jaffe Woman Writers Award, and residences from Civitella di Ranieri and the Lannan Foundation. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in American Poetry ReviewPloughsharesThe New York TimesBoston Review and New England Review, among others. She is Senior Poetry Editor at Los Angeles Review of Books and Founder and Senior Curator at Voluble, a forthcoming channel from Los Angeles Review of Books. She teaches in the Warren Wilson Program for Writers and at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She makes new economies with those who wish to. She tweets at @rocketfantastic and is on Instagram as gabbat. She is at work on a memoir entitled The Year I Didn’t Kill Myself.

Carolyn Ferrell is the author of the short-story collection, Don’t Erase Me, which was awarded the 1997 Art Seidenbaum Award of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the John C. Zachiris First Fiction Prize given by Ploughshares, and the Quality Paperback Book Prize for First Fiction. Her stories and essays have been anthologized in Best American Short Stories 2018, edited by Roxane Gay; The Best American Short Stories of the Century, edited by John Updike; Children of the Night: The Best Short Stories by Black Writers, 1967 to the Present edited by Gloria Naylor; and most recently Apple, Tree: Writers on their Parents, edited by Lise Funderberg. She is the recipient of grants from the Fulbright Association, the German Academic Exchange (D.A.A.D.), the Bronx Council on the Arts, and National Endowment for the Arts. Since 1996, she has been a faculty member in both the undergraduate and MFA programs at Sarah Lawrence College. She lives in New York with her husband and children.

C.J. Hribal is the author of the novel The Company Car, which won the Anne Powers Book Award, and three other works of fiction.  His collection of novellas and stories, The Clouds in Memphis, won the AWP Prize in Short Fiction. He is also the author of the novel American Beauty, the collection of stories and novellas, Matty’s Heart, and he edited the collection The Boundaries of Twilight: Czecho-Slovak Writing from the New World. His story, “Do I Look Sick to You? (Notes on How to Make Love to a Cancer Patient)” won the Goldenberg Prize for Fiction, and he has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Bush Foundation. His BA is from St. Norbert College and his MA from Syracuse University. He is the Louise Edna Goeden Professor of English at Marquette University in Milwaukee.

Vanessa Hua has been writing about Asia and the diaspora in journalism and in fiction for more than two decades. She’s the author of A River of Stars, longlisted for the Chautauqua Prize, and was named a best book of the year by NPR and the Washington Post. Her short story collection, Deceit and Other Possibilities, winner of the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature, was a finalist for the California Book Award, and a One City/One Book pick for El Cerrito. Her honors include a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award, a Steinbeck Fellowship in Creative Writing, the San Francisco Foundation’s James D. Phelan Award, as well as awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Asian American Journalists Association, among others. Acolumnist for the San Francisco Chronicle, she has also written for the New York Times, The Atlantic, and Paris Review Daily, among other publications. She has taught at the Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Tin House Winter Workshop, Mendocino Coast Writers Conference, and the Writers Grotto in San Francisco. She has a BA and MA from Stanford University and an MFA from the University of California-Riverside. The daughter of Chinese immigrants, she lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her family. Her forthcoming novel will be published by Ballantine.

Sally Keith’s fourth collection of poetry, River House was recently published by Milkweed Editions; she is the author of The Fact of the Matter (Milkweed 2012) and two previous collections of poetry, Design, winner of the 2000 Colorado Prize for Poetry, and Dwelling Song (UGA 2004).  She has published poems in a variety of literary journals, including Gettysburg Review, New England Review, A Public Space, Black Clock and Literary Imagination.  Recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize and recent fellowships at Virginia Center for Creative Arts, UCROSS Foundation and Fundación Valparaíso, she is a member of the MFA Faculty at George Mason University and lives in Washington DC.