Lesley Nneka Arimah is the author of What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky, a collection of short stories from Riverhead Books. Her collection was named one of the best books of 2017 by NPR, The Guardian, The New Yorker, Publishers Weekly, Shelf Awareness, LitHub, and more. Her stories have been honored with a National Magazine Award, the Caine Prize, a Commonwealth Short Story Prize, and an O. Henry Award. Arimah’s work has appeared in The New YorkerHarper’sMcSweeney’s, and GRANTA among other publications, and has received support from The Elizabeth George Foundation, MacDowell, Breadloaf and others. What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky was selected for the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35 and won the 2017 Kirkus Prize, the 2018 New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award, and was selected for the New York Times/PBS book club among other honors. Arimah is a 2019 United States Artists Fellow in Writing. She lives in the Midwest and is working on a novel about you.

Debra Allbery received her MFA from the University of Iowa and her MA from the University of Virginia. Her first collection of poetry, Walking Distance, won the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize and was published by the University of Pittsburgh Press. Her collection, Fimbul-Winter, was published by Four Way Books in October 2010 and won the Grub Street National Book Prize in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry, Yale Review, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, New England Review, The Nation, FIELD, TriQuarterly, and elsewhere. She has twice received fellowships from the NEA; other awards include the “Discovery”/The Nation Award, a Hawthornden fellowship, and two grants from the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts. She has taught writing and literature at Phillips Exeter Academy, Interlochen Arts Academy, Randolph College, Dickinson College, and the University of Michigan. Deb first taught in the Program in 1995; she became the director in June 2009.

Mia Alvar is the author of the story collection In the Country, which won the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction, the University of Rochester’s Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize, and the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Award. Mia has been a writer in residence at Yaddo, the Djerassi Resident Artists Program, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and the Blue Mountain Center for the Arts; and has received fellowships from the Sewanee, Bread Loaf, and Sirenland Writers’ Conferences. Her work has appeared in The New York Times Book Review, One Story, The Missouri Review, the Cincinnati Review, and elsewhere. She has taught fiction at Columbia University’s School of the Arts, where she also received her MFA. Born in the Philippines and raised in Bahrain and New York, she lives in southern California.

Sally Ball is the author of three collections of poems, Hold Sway, Wreck Me and Annus Mirabilis. She has published essays and reviews in Lithub, NOR, Pleiades, The Review of Contemporary Fiction, The Volta, and elsewhere. Her poems have appeared in The American Poetry Review, Bennington Review, Boston Review (Forum 3), Harvard Review, Ploughshares, Tin House, Yale Review, and other magazines, as well as online at The Awl, Narrative, and Slate, and in The Best American Poetry anthology. Professor of English and director of creative writing at Arizona State University, Ball is also the associate director of Four Way Books. She has been with the press for 25 of its 28 years. She has received fellowships from the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, CAMAC Centre d’Art, and elsewhere. Her long poem “HOLD” has been made into a large-format artist’s book by the Czech printmaker Jan Vičar (2018).

Robert Boswell is the author of seven novels, three story collections, two plays, a cyberpunk novel, and two books of nonfiction. He has received National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Iowa School of Letters Award for Fiction, the PEN West Award for Fiction, the John Gassner Prize for Playwriting, and the Evil Companions Award. The Heyday of the Insensitive Bastards was a finalist for the 2010 PEN USA Literary Award in fiction. His stories have appeared in the New Yorker, Harper’s, Best American Short Stories, O. Henry Prize Stories, Pushcart Prize Stories, Esquire, Colorado Review, and many other magazines. Boswell teaches creative writing at the University of Houston, where he holds the Cullen Endowed Chair in Creative Writing, and in the Warren Wilson MFA Program.

Karen Brennan received her MFA from Goddard (the former Warren Wilson!) and her PhD from the University of Arizona. She is the author of three books of poems, Here on Earth, The Real Enough World and, most recently, little dark; three collections of short stories, Wild Desire, which won the AWP Award for Short Fiction in 1990, The Garden in Which I Walk and most recently, the hybrid collection, Monsters; and a memoir, Being With Rachel: A Personal Story of Memory and Survival. Her new hybrid prose poem/essay, Television, a memoir is forthcoming in 2022. A recipient of a National Endowment of the Arts Award, her essays, stories and poems have appeared in anthologies from Graywolf, Norton, Penguin, Spuytin Duyvil, Michigan, and Georgia among others. She is Professor of English Emerita from the University of Utah.

Christopher Castellani‘s fourth novel, Leading Men — for which he received fellowships from
the Guggenheim Foundation, the Massachusetts Cultural Council, and the MacDowell Colony —
was published by Viking in February 2019. His collection of essays on point of view in
fiction, The Art of Perspective, was published by Graywolf in 2016. His three previous novels, a
trilogy that follows an immigrant Italian family, were published by Algonquin. Castellani is on
the fiction faculty of the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and he has been a fiction supervisor
and frequent member of the academic board at Warren Wilson since 2008. He lives in Boston,
where he is artistic director of GrubStreet.

Sonya Chung is the author of the novels Long for This World (Scribner, 2010) and The Loved Ones (Relegation Books, 2016), which was a selection for Kirkus Best Fiction, NYTimes Matchbook Recommends, IndieNext, Library Journal Best Indie, The Nervous Breakdown Book Club, and Buzzfeed Books Recommends, among others. She is a recipient of a Pushcart Prize nomination, the Charles Johnson Fiction Award, a MacDowell Colony Fellowship, a Key West Literary Seminars residency, and an Escape to Create artist residency. Her essays have appeared at Tin House, Buzzfeed, The Huffington Post, The Threepenny Review, and in the anthologies This is The Place: Women Writing About Home, The Late American Novel: Writers on the Future of Books, Conversations with James Salter, and Short: An International Anthology. Sonya is a staff writer for The Millions, founding editor of Bloom, and has taught writing at Columbia University, NYU, the Gotham Writers Workshop, and Skidmore College, where currently she is Artist-in-Residence. She lives in New York City, where she also works as Deputy Director at Film Forum, a nonprofit art cinema.

Daisy Fried’s book of poems adapted from Baudelaire, The Year the City Emptied, is forthcoming from Flood Editions in 2022. She is the author of three other books of poetry: Women’s Poetry: Poems and Advice, My Brother is Getting Arrested Again, and She Didn’t Mean to Do It. She has been awarded Guggenheim, Hodder and Pew Fellowships, a Pushcart Prize, and the Editors’ Prize from Poetry. She teaches in the BFA program in Creative Writing at the University of the Arts, is poetry editor for the journal Scoundrel Time, and lives in Philadelphia.

Brooks Haxton has published seven collections of shorter poems, two book-length narrative poems, one book of creative nonfiction, and four books of translations. He has received grants and awards from the NEA, the NEH, the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Fellowship of Southern Writers, and others. He lives with his wife in Syracuse and teaches at Syracuse University.