Oliver Baez Bendorf collaborates with language to imagine new possibilities for gender and nature. He’s received fellowships from the NEA, Vermont Studio Center, CantoMundo, and the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, and The Publishing Triangle’s Betty Berzon Award. His first book of poetry, The Spectral Wilderness, was selected by Mark Doty for the Stan and Tom Wick Poetry Prize and published by Kent State University Press. His second book, Advantages of Being Evergreen, won the Open Book Prize from Cleveland State University Poetry Center. His writing has appeared in, or is forthcoming from, Best American Poetry 2022, American Poetry Review, Denver Quarterly, The Nation, New England Review, Orion, POETRY Magazine, Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics, and elsewhere. Previously he’s taught in the undergraduate creative writing programs at University of Wisconsin-Madison and Kalamazoo College. He lives with his partner and rabbit in the Pacific Northwest.

CM Burroughs is associate professor of creative writing at Columbia College Chicago and author of The Vital System (Tupelo, 2012) and Master Suffering (Tupelo, 2021), which was longlisted for the National Book Award and a finalist for the Lambda Book Award and L.A. Times Book Award. Burroughs’ poetry has appeared in journals and anthologies including Poetry, Ploughshares, Cave Canem’s Gathering Ground, and Best American Experimental Writing. Burroughs has been awarded fellowships and grants from Yaddo, MacDowell, Djerassi Foundation, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and Cave Canem Foundation.

Akil Kumarasamy is the author of the interlinked story collection Half Gods, which was named a New York Times Editors’ Choice and a finalist for the PEN/Robert Bingham Prize, and was awarded the Bard Fiction Prize and the Story Prize Spotlight Award. Her work has appeared in Harper’sAmerican Short FictionBOMB, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships from the University of East Anglia, the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, Yaddo, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. She is an assistant professor at the Rutgers-Newark MFA program. Her debut novel, Meet Us by the Roaring Sea, was published by FSG in August 2022. 

Mia Alvar is the author of the story collection In the Country, which won the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction, the University of Rochester’s Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize, and the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Award. Mia has been a writer in residence at Yaddo, the Djerassi Resident Artists Program, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and the Blue Mountain Center for the Arts; and has received fellowships from the Sewanee, Bread Loaf, and Sirenland Writers’ Conferences. Her work has appeared in The New York Times Book Review, One Story, The Missouri Review, the Cincinnati Review, and elsewhere. She has taught fiction at Columbia University’s School of the Arts, where she also received her MFA. Born in the Philippines and raised in Bahrain and New York, she lives in southern California.

Dilruba Ahmed is the author Bring Now the Angels (Pitt Poetry Series, 2020), with poems featured in New York Times Magazine, The Slowdown, and Poetry Unbound with Pádraig Ó Tuama. Her debut book of poetry, Dhaka Dust (Graywolf Press, 2011), won the Bakeless Prize. Her poems have appeared in Kenyon Review, New England Review, and Ploughshares. Her poems have also been anthologized in The Best American Poetry 2019 (Scribner), Halal If You Hear Me (Haymarket Books), Literature: The Human Experience (Bedford/St. Martin’s), and elsewhere. Ahmed is the recipient of The Florida Review’s Editors’ Award, a Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Memorial Prize, and the Katharine Bakeless Nason Fellowship in Poetry awarded by the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. She has taught creative writing with Chatham University’s MFA Program, Hugo House in Seattle, and online with The Writing Lab. Website: www.dilrubaahmed.com/

Lysley Tenorio is the author of the novel The Son of Good Fortune, winner of the New American Voices Award, and the story collection Monstress, named a book of the year by the San Francisco Chronicle. He is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, a Whiting Award, a Stegner fellowship, and the Rome Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, as well as residencies from the MacDowell Colony,
Yaddo, and the Bogliasco Foundation. His stories have appeared in the Atlantic, Zoetrope: All-Story, and Ploughshares, and have been adapted for the stage by The American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco and the Ma-Yi Theater in New York City. He was a 2021 finalist for the Joyce Carol Oates Prize, and will be a 2021-22 Radcliffe Fellow at Harvard University. He is a professor at Saint Mary’s College of California.

Robert Boswell is the author of six novels, three story collections, a play, a cyberpunk novel, and two books of nonfiction. He has received National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Iowa School of Letters Award for Fiction, the PEN West Award for Fiction, the John Gassner Prize for Playwriting, and the Evil Companions Award. His stories have appeared in the New Yorker, Best American Short Stories, O. Henry Prize Stories, Pushcart Prize Stories, Esquire, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Harpers, and many other magazines. He is married to Antonya Nelson. They share the Cullen Endowed Chair in Creative Writing at the University of Houston.

Jamel Brinkley is the author of A Lucky Man, finalist for the National Book Award and winner of the PEN Oakland Prize and the Ernest J Gaines Prize for Literary Excellence. He is currently a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University.

Maud Casey is the author of five works of fiction, most recently City of Incurable Women, and a work of nonfiction, The Art of Mystery: The Search for Questions. Her essays and book reviews have appeared in A Public Space, Literary Imagination, New England Review, The New York Times, Poetry Daily, and The Sewannee Review. She is the recipient of the Calvino Prize, the St. Francis College Literary Prize, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She lives in Washington, D.C., and teaches in the MFA program at the University of Maryland.

Christopher Castellani’s fourth novel, Leading Men — for which he received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Massachusetts Cultural Council, and the MacDowell Colony — was published by Viking in February 2019. His collection of essays on point of view in fiction, The Art of Perspective, was published by Graywolf in 2016. His three previous novels, a trilogy that follows an immigrant Italian family, were published by Algonquin. Castellani is on the fiction faculty of the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and he has been a fiction supervisor and frequent member of the academic board at Warren Wilson since 2008. He lives in Provincetown and Boston, where he is currently the Writer-in-Residence at Brandeis University.