Tom Drury is the author of five novels, two screenplays, and numerous short stories. He received an MFA from Brown University, and eleven chapters of his first novel, The End of Vandalism, appeared serially in The New Yorker. His short fiction and essays have also appeared in The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Harper’s, The Mississippi Review, Tricycle: The Buddhist Review, and the anthologies Best of BBC Radio’s Recent Short Fiction and Reverse Engineering II. His novels have been translated into Italian, Spanish, French, and German, and his work has been supported by the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Academy in Berlin, and MacDowell. He’s taught fiction writing at the Iowa Writer’s Workshop, Bard College Berlin, the University of Leipzig, Hollins University, and Wesleyan University. His novel Pacific was longlisted for the National Book Award in 2013.

Mecca Jamilah Sullivan, Ph.D., is the author of three books: the novel Big Girl, a New York Times Editors’ Choice and winner of the Balcones Fiction Prize and the Next Generation Indie Book Award for First Novel; a short story collection, Blue Talk and Love, winner of the Judith Markowitz Award from Lambda Literary; and The Poetics of Difference: Queer Feminist Forms in the African Diaspora, winner of the William Sanders Scarborough Prize from the MLA. In her writing, she explores the links between language, imagination, and bodily life in Black queer and feminist experience. Her work has earned honors and support from Bread Loaf, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, the Institute for Citizens and Scholars, the Mellon Foundation, the Center for Fiction, the NEA and others. Originally from Harlem, NY, she is Associate Professor of English at Georgetown University and lives in Washington DC.

Natalie Bakopoulos is the author of two novels: Scorpionfish (Tin House, 2020) and The Green Shore (Simon & Schuster, 2012). Her work has appeared in Ploughshares, Kenyon Review, Tin House, VQR, The Iowa Review, The New York Times, Granta, MQR, The Mississippi Review, O. Henry Prize Stories, and various other publications. She received her MFA from the University of Michigan, and in 2015 she was a Fulbright scholar in Athens. She’s an associate professor at Wayne State University in Detroit.

Poet, fiction writer and memoirist, Karen Brennan is the author of nine books including the forthcoming Rabbit in the Moon: The Mexico Stories, and, most recently, Television, a Memoir, a hybrid collection of micro-memoir and lyric essays. Her work has been appeared in anthologies from Norton, Penguin, Greywolf, Michigan, Georgia and Spuyten Duyvil, among others. She is a recipient of an AWP award in fiction, a PEN Syndicated Fiction Award and a fellowship from the National Endowment of the Arts. A Professor Emerita from The University of Utah, Brennan lives in Tucson where she paints, writes and ruminates abstractly and expressionistically.

Rita Banerjee is the author of the poetry collections Echo in Four Beats, which was named one of Book Riot’s “Must-Read Poetic Voices of Split This Rock 2018,” and Cracklers at Night. She is also editor of CREDO: An Anthology of Manifestos and Sourcebook for Creative Writing, and author of the novella “A Night with Kali” in Approaching Footsteps. She received her doctorate in Comparative Literature from Harvard University and her MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Washington, and has taught creative writing, pedagogy, publishing, foreign language, and literature courses at Harvard, UC Berkeley, LMU Munich, Vermont College of Fine Arts, and elsewhere. She received a Certificate of Distinction in Teaching from the Derek Bok Center at Harvard University and is a recipient of the Tom and Laurel Nebel Fellowship, South Asia Initiative Grants, and Tata Grants among other awards. She serves as Editor-at-Large of the South Asian Avant-Garde and Executive Creative Director of the Cambridge Writers’ Workshop. Her work appears in Academy of American Poets, Poets & Writers, PANK, Nat. Brut., Hunger Mountain, Tupelo Quarterly, Isele Magazine, Los Angeles Review of Books, VIDA, Vermont Public Radio, and elsewhere. She is the co-writer and co-director of Burning Down the Louvre, a forthcoming documentary film about race, intimacy, and tribalism in the United States and in France. She received a 2021-2022 Creation Grant from the Vermont Arts Council for her new memoir and manifesto Merchants of Cool: How Female Cool Could Not Be Sold, and one of the opening chapters of this memoir, “Birth of Cool” was a Notable Essay in the 2020 Best American Essays. She is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing and Director of the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.

Hanna Pylväinen is the author of the novel We Sinners, which received the 2012 Whiting Award, and the novel The End of Drum-Time, a finalist for the 2023 National Book Award. Her work has appeared in Harper’s, The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, the Chicago Tribune, The Wall Street Journal and LitHub. She is the recipient of residencies at MacDowell, Yaddo, and the Lásságámmi Foundation, as well as fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University, and the Cullman Center at the New York Public Library, among others.

Antonya Nelson is the author of four novels and seven short story collections, including Funny Once, released in May 2014. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Esquire, Harper’s, Redbook, and many other magazines, as well as in anthologies such as The O. Henry Awards and Best American Short Stories.  She is the recipient of Guggenheim, NEA, and USA Artists Fellowships, as well as the Rea Award for Short Fiction.  She lives in New Mexico, Colorado, and Texas, where she holds the Cullen Chair in Creative Writing at the University of Houston.

Marisa Silver is the author, most recently, of the novel Little Nothing, a New York Times Editor’s Choice, and winner of the 2017 Ohioana Award for Fiction. Her other novels include Mary Coin, a New York Times Bestseller and winner of the Southern California Independent Bookseller’s Award, The God of War, a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for fiction, and No Direction Home. Her first collection of short stories, Babe in Paradise was named a New York Times Notable Book of the Year and was a Los Angeles Times Best Book of the Year. When her second collection, Alone With You was published, The New York Times called her “one of California’s most celebrated contemporary writers.” Silver has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library.  Silver’s fiction has been included in The Best American Short Stories, the O. Henry Prize Stories, as well as other anthologies. She received her MFA from The MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson.

Liam Callanan’s most recent book, When in Rome, came out in March 2023 from Dutton. His novel Paris by the Book was a national bestseller and was translated into German, Italian and Chinese. His story collection, Listen & Other Stories won George W. Hunt, SJ Prize in Arts & Letters, and his novel The Cloud Atlas was a finalist for the Edgar Award. He’s written for Slate, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and about chasing children’s books (in France and Greece) for the Wall Street Journal. Liam was also the founder and executive producer of the nationwide Poetry Everywhere animated film project. He teaches in the English department at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he was previously department chair and director of its doctoral program in creative writing.

Dean Bakopoulos’ first novel, Please Don’t Come Back from the Moon (Harcourt, 2005), was a New York Times Notable Book; Bakopoulos co-wrote the film adaptation, which premiered last year at the Los Angeles Film Festival. His second novel, My American Unhappiness (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011) was named one of the year’s best novels by The Chicago Tribune, and his latest novel Summerlong (Ecco, 2015) made the independent bookstore bestseller list. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, Dean is now writer-in-residence at Grinnell College in Iowa, where he lives with his spouse, novelist Alissa Nutting, and their blended family of three kids. Dean and Alissa are now at work on a television series based on Alissa’s novel, Made For Love.