Lesley Nneka Arimah is the author of What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky, a collection of short stories from Riverhead Books. Her collection was named one of the best books of 2017 by NPR, The Guardian, The New Yorker, Publishers Weekly, Shelf Awareness, LitHub, and more. Her stories have been honored with a National Magazine Award, the Caine Prize, a Commonwealth Short Story Prize, and an O. Henry Award. Arimah’s work has appeared in The New YorkerHarper’sMcSweeney’s, and GRANTA among other publications, and has received support from The Elizabeth George Foundation, MacDowell, Breadloaf and others. What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky was selected for the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35 and won the 2017 Kirkus Prize, the 2018 New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award, and was selected for the New York Times/PBS book club among other honors. Arimah is a 2019 United States Artists Fellow in Writing. She lives in the Midwest and is working on a novel about you.

Robert Boswell is the author of seven novels, three story collections, two plays, a cyberpunk novel, and two books of nonfiction. He has received National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Iowa School of Letters Award for Fiction, the PEN West Award for Fiction, the John Gassner Prize for Playwriting, and the Evil Companions Award. The Heyday of the Insensitive Bastards was a finalist for the 2010 PEN USA Literary Award in fiction. His stories have appeared in the New Yorker, Harper’s, Best American Short Stories, O. Henry Prize Stories, Pushcart Prize Stories, Esquire, Colorado Review, and many other magazines. Boswell teaches creative writing at the University of Houston, where he holds the Cullen Endowed Chair in Creative Writing, and in the Warren Wilson MFA Program.

Karen Brennan received her MFA from Goddard (the former Warren Wilson!) and her PhD from the University of Arizona. She is the author of three books of poems, Here on Earth, The Real Enough World and, most recently, little dark; three collections of short stories, Wild Desire, which won the AWP Award for Short Fiction in 1990, The Garden in Which I Walk and most recently, the hybrid collection, Monsters; and a memoir, Being With Rachel: A Personal Story of Memory and Survival. Her new hybrid prose poem/essay, Television, a memoir is forthcoming in 2022. A recipient of a National Endowment of the Arts Award, her essays, stories and poems have appeared in anthologies from Graywolf, Norton, Penguin, Spuytin Duyvil, Michigan, and Georgia among others. She is Professor of English Emerita from the University of Utah.

Christopher Castellani‘s fourth novel, Leading Men — for which he received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Massachusetts Cultural Council, and the MacDowell Colony — was published by Viking in February 2019. His collection of essays on point of view in fiction, The Art of Perspective, was published by Graywolf in 2016. His three previous novels, a trilogy that follows an immigrant Italian family, were published by Algonquin. Castellani is on the fiction faculty of the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and he has been a fiction supervisor and frequent member of the academic board at Warren Wilson since 2008. He lives in Boston, where he is artistic director of GrubStreet.

Sonya Chung is the author of the novels Long for This World (Scribner, 2010) and The Loved Ones (Relegation Books, 2016), which was a selection for Kirkus Best Fiction, NYTimes Matchbook Recommends, IndieNext, Library Journal Best Indie, The Nervous Breakdown Book Club, and Buzzfeed Books Recommends, among others. She is a recipient of a Pushcart Prize nomination, the Charles Johnson Fiction Award, a MacDowell Colony Fellowship, a Key West Literary Seminars residency, and an Escape to Create artist residency. Her essays have appeared at Tin House, Buzzfeed, The Huffington Post, The Threepenny Review, and in the anthologies This is The Place: Women Writing About Home, The Late American Novel: Writers on the Future of Books, Conversations with James Salter, and Short: An International Anthology. Sonya is a staff writer for The Millions, founding editor of Bloom, and has taught writing at Columbia University, NYU, the Gotham Writers Workshop, and Skidmore College, where currently she is Artist-in-Residence. She lives in New York City, where she also works as Deputy Director at Film Forum, a nonprofit art cinema.

David Haynes is the author of seven novels for adults and five books for younger readers. He is an emeritus professor of English at Southern Methodist University, where he directed the creative writing program for ten years. Since 1996 he has taught regularly in MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College, and has also taught writing at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, Hamline University, at the Writer’s Center in Bethesda, MD, and at the Writers’ Garret in Dallas. He has received a fellowship from the Minnesota State Arts Board, and several of his short stories have been read and recorded for the National Public Radio series “Selected Shorts.” His seventh and most recently novel is A Star in the Face of the Sky. He is also the author of a series for children called “The West Seventh Wildcats.” His upcoming book is a collection, Martha’s Daughter: A Novella and Stories.

Novelist and filmmaker T. Geronimo Johnson was born in New Orleans. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a former Stegner Fellow, Johnson has taught writing at UC Berkeley, Stanford, the Writers’ Workshop, the Prague Summer Program, Oregon State University, San Quentin, Texas State, and elsewhere. He has worked on, at, or in brokerages, kitchens, construction sites, phone rooms, education non-profits, writing centers, summer camps,
ladies shoe stores, nightclubs, law firms, offset print shops, and a (pre-2016) political campaign that shall remain unnamed. He also wrote a couple of novels that have—between the two—been selected by the Wall Street Journal Book Club, named a 2013 PEN/Faulkner Award finalist, shortlisted for the 2016 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, longlisted for the National Book Award, longlisted for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction, named a finalist for The Bridge Book Award, named a finalist for the Mark Twain American Voice in Literature Award, adapted into a critically acclaimed play, included on Time Magazine’s list of the top ten books of 2015, awarded the Saroyan International Prize for Writing, and named the winner of the 2015 Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence. Johnson was also a National Book Award judge in 2016, the recipient of the inaugural Simpson Family Literary Prize in 2017, and a 2017-2018 Rome Prize Fellow. He lives in Rome, Italy. geronimo1.com.

Debra Spark is the author of six books of fiction, including, most recently, Unknown Caller, The Pretty Girl, and Good for the Jews. Other books include two essay collections on fiction writing (Curious Attractions and And Then Something Happened) and the anthology Twenty Under Thirty. Spark has published numerous articles, book reviews, short stories, essays, travel articles, food articles, and op-eds in publications like Agni, the Boston Globe, the Cincinnati Review, the Chicago Tribune, Epoch, Esquire, Five Points, Food and Wine, Harvard Review, the Huffington Post, Maine Magazine, Narrative, New England Travel and Life, the New England Review, the New York Times, Ploughshares, salon.com, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Washington Post, Yale Alumni Magazine, and Yankee, among other places. For a decade, she had a side specialty in writing about art, home and design for magazines like Décor, Dwell, Elysian, Interiors, New England Home, Maine Home+Design, and Down East, among other places. She has been the recipient of several awards including a Maine Humanities Council “One State/One Read” program, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, a Bunting Institute fellowship from Radcliffe College, a Wisconsin Institute Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize, a Michigan Literary Fiction Award, and the John Zacharis/Ploughshares award for best first book. A graduate of Yale University and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, she is a professor at Colby College and has taught in the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College since 1996. She lives north of Portland, Maine.

Peter Turchi is the author of six books, including A Muse and A Maze: Writing as Puzzle, Mystery, and Magic; Maps of the Imagination: The Writer as Cartographer; a novel, The Girls Next Door; a collection of stories, Magician; and the catalogue for the touring exhibition Suburban Journals: The Sketchbooks, Drawings and Prints of Charles Ritchie. His story “Night, Truck, Two Lights Burning” has been produced as a limited-edition artist’s book with images by Ritchie. He has co-edited, with Andrea Barrett, A Kite in the Wind: Fiction Writers on Their Craft and The Story Behind the Story: 26 Stories by Contemporary Writers and How They Work, and, with Charles Baxter, Bringing the Devil to His Knees: The Craft of Fiction and the Writing Life. His writing has appeared online in Tin House, The Huffington Post, and Fiction Writers Review, and in Ploughshares, Story, Alaska Quarterly Review, Puerto del Sol, and Colorado Review, among other magazines. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, an NEA Fellowship, and North Carolina’s
Sir Walter Raleigh Award, he served as Director of Warren Wilson’s MFA Program for Writers from 1993-2008 and as Director of Creative Writing at Arizona State University from 2008 – 2013. He currently teaches at the University of Houston.