Dean Bakopoulos’ first novel, Please Don’t Come Back from the Moon (Harcourt, 2005), was a New York Times Notable Book; Bakopoulos co-wrote the film adaptation, which premiered last year at the Los Angeles Film Festival. His second novel, My American Unhappiness (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011) was named one of the year’s best novels by The Chicago Tribune, and his latest novel Summerlong (Ecco, 2015) made the independent bookstore bestseller list. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, Dean is now writer-in-residence at Grinnell College in Iowa, where he lives with his spouse, novelist Alissa Nutting, and their blended family of three kids. Dean and Alissa are now at work on a television series based on Alissa’s novel, Made For Love.

Liam Callanan’s newest novel, Paris by the Book, was a national bestseller and has been translated into German, Italian and Chinese. His story collection, Listen & Other Stories won George W. Hunt, SJ Prize in Arts & Letters, and his novel The Cloud Atlas was a finalist for the Edgar Award. He’s written for Slate, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and about chasing children’s books (in France and Greece) for the Wall Street Journal. Liam’s also the founder and executive producer of the nationwide Poetry Everywhere animated film project (poetryeverywhere.org). He teaches in the English department at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he was previously department chair and director of its doctoral program in creative writing. He earned an MFA from George Mason University, an MA at Georgetown and a BA at Yale.

David Haynes is the author of seven novels for adults and five books for younger readers. He is an emeritus professor of English at Southern Methodist University, where he directed the creative writing program for ten years. Since 1996 he has taught regularly in MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College, and has also taught writing at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, Hamline University, at the Writer’s Center in Bethesda, MD, and at the Writers’ Garret in Dallas. He has received a fellowship from the Minnesota State Arts Board, and several of his short stories have been read and recorded for the National Public Radio series “Selected Shorts.” His seventh and most recently novel is A Star in the Face of the Sky. He is also the author of a series for children called “The West Seventh Wildcats.” His upcoming book is a collection, Martha’s Daughter: A Novella and Stories.

C.J. Hribal is the author of the novel The Company Car, which won the Anne Powers Book Award, and three other works of fiction.  His collection of novellas and stories, The Clouds in Memphis, won the AWP Prize in Short Fiction. He is also the author of the novel American Beauty, the collection of stories and novellas, Matty’s Heart, and he edited the collection The Boundaries of Twilight: Czecho-Slovak Writing from the New World. His story, “Do I Look Sick to You? (Notes on How to Make Love to a Cancer Patient)” won the Goldenberg Prize for Fiction, and he has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Bush Foundation. His BA is from St. Norbert College and his MA from Syracuse University. He is the Louise Edna Goeden Professor of English at Marquette University in Milwaukee.

Vanessa Hua has been writing about Asia and the diaspora in journalism and in fiction for more than two decades. She’s the author of A River of Stars, longlisted for the Chautauqua Prize, and was named a best book of the year by NPR and the Washington Post. Her short story collection, Deceit and Other Possibilities, winner of the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature, was a finalist for the California Book Award, and a One City/One Book pick for El Cerrito. Her honors include a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award, a Steinbeck Fellowship in Creative Writing, the San Francisco Foundation’s James D. Phelan Award, as well as awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Asian American Journalists Association, among others. Acolumnist for the San Francisco Chronicle, she has also written for the New York Times, The Atlantic, and Paris Review Daily, among other publications. She has taught at the Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Tin House Winter Workshop, Mendocino Coast Writers Conference, and the Writers Grotto in San Francisco. She has a BA and MA from Stanford University and an MFA from the University of California-Riverside. The daughter of Chinese immigrants, she lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her family. Her forthcoming novel will be published by Ballantine.

Novelist and filmmaker T. Geronimo Johnson was born in New Orleans. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a former Stegner Fellow, Johnson has taught writing at UC Berkeley, Stanford, the Writers’ Workshop, the Prague Summer Program, Oregon State University, San Quentin, Texas State, and elsewhere. He has worked on, at, or in brokerages, kitchens, construction sites, phone rooms, education non-profits, writing centers, summer camps,
ladies shoe stores, nightclubs, law firms, offset print shops, and a (pre-2016) political campaign that shall remain unnamed. He also wrote a couple of novels that have—between the two—been selected by the Wall Street Journal Book Club, named a 2013 PEN/Faulkner Award finalist, shortlisted for the 2016 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, longlisted for the National Book Award, longlisted for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction, named a finalist for The Bridge Book Award, named a finalist for the Mark Twain American Voice in Literature Award, adapted into a critically acclaimed play, included on Time Magazine’s list of the top ten books of 2015, awarded the Saroyan International Prize for Writing, and named the winner of the 2015 Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence. Johnson was also a National Book Award judge in 2016, the recipient of the inaugural Simpson Family Literary Prize in 2017, and a 2017-2018 Rome Prize Fellow. He lives in Rome, Italy. geronimo1.com.

Akil Kumarasamy is the author of the interlinked story collection Half Gods, which was named a New York Times Editors’ Choice and a finalist for the PEN/Robert Bingham Prize, and was awarded the Bard Fiction Prize and the Story Prize Spotlight Award. Her work has appeared in Harper’sAmerican Short FictionBOMB, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships from the University of East Anglia, the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, Yaddo, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. She is an assistant professor at the Rutgers-Newark MFA program. Her debut novel, Meet Us by the Roaring Sea, is forthcoming with FSG in August 2022. 

Antonya Nelson is the author of four novels and seven short story collections, including Funny Once, released in May 2014. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Esquire, Harper’s, Redbook, and many other magazines, as well as in anthologies such as The O. Henry Awards and Best American Short Stories.  She is the recipient of Guggenheim, NEA, and USA Artists Fellowships, as well as the Rea Award for Short Fiction.  She lives in New Mexico, Colorado, and Texas, where she holds the Cullen Chair in Creative Writing at the University of Houston.

Alix Ohlin is the author of five books, most recently the novel, Dual Citizens, She lives in Vancouver, where she chairs the creative writing program at the University of British Columbia. She joined the Program faculty in 2008.

Michael Parker is the author of seven novels and three collections of stories. He has received fellowships in fiction from the NC Arts Council and the NEA, as well as the Hobson Award for Arts & Letters. He recently retired from UNC Greensboro and has taught with us since 2006.