Debra Allbery received her MFA from the University of Iowa and her MA from the University of Virginia. Her first collection of poetry, Walking Distance, won the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize and was published by the University of Pittsburgh Press. Her collection, Fimbul-Winter, was published by Four Way Books in October 2010 and won the Grub Street National Book Prize in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry, Yale Review, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, New England Review, The Nation, FIELD, TriQuarterly, and elsewhere. She has twice received fellowships from the NEA; other awards include the “Discovery”/The Nation Award, a Hawthornden fellowship, and two grants from the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts. She has taught writing and literature at Phillips Exeter Academy, Interlochen Arts Academy, Randolph College, Dickinson College, and the University of Michigan. Deb first taught in the Program in 1995; she became the director in June 2009.

Sally Ball is the author of three collections of poems, Hold Sway, Wreck Me and Annus Mirabilis. She has published essays and reviews in Lithub, NOR, Pleiades, The Review of Contemporary Fiction, The Volta, and elsewhere. Her poems have appeared in The American Poetry Review, Bennington Review, Boston Review (Forum 3), Harvard Review, Ploughshares, Tin House, Yale Review, and other magazines, as well as online at The Awl, Narrative, and Slate, and in The Best American Poetry anthology. Professor of English and director of creative writing at Arizona State University, Ball is also the associate director of Four Way Books. She has been with the press for 25 of its 28 years. She has received fellowships from the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, CAMAC Centre d’Art, and elsewhere. Her long poem “HOLD” has been made into a large-format artist’s book by the Czech printmaker Jan Vičar (2018).

Karen Brennan received her MFA from Goddard (the former Warren Wilson!) and her PhD from the University of Arizona. She is the author of three books of poems, Here on Earth, The Real Enough World and, most recently, little dark; three collections of short stories, Wild Desire, which won the AWP Award for Short Fiction in 1990, The Garden in Which I Walk and most recently, the hybrid collection, Monsters; and a memoir, Being With Rachel: A Personal Story of Memory and Survival. Her new hybrid prose poem/essay, Television, a memoir is forthcoming in 2022. A recipient of a National Endowment of the Arts Award, her essays, stories and poems have appeared in anthologies from Graywolf, Norton, Penguin, Spuytin Duyvil, Michigan, and Georgia among others. She is Professor of English Emerita from the University of Utah.

Daisy Fried’s book of poems adapted from Baudelaire, The Year the City Emptied, is forthcoming from Flood Editions in 2022. She is the author of three other books of poetry: Women’s Poetry: Poems and Advice, My Brother is Getting Arrested Again, and She Didn’t Mean to Do It. She has been awarded Guggenheim, Hodder and Pew Fellowships, a Pushcart Prize, and the Editors’ Prize from Poetry. She teaches in the BFA program in Creative Writing at the University of the Arts, is poetry editor for the journal Scoundrel Time, and lives in Philadelphia.

Brooks Haxton has published seven collections of shorter poems, two book-length narrative poems, one book of creative nonfiction, and four books of translations. He has received grants and awards from the NEA, the NEH, the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Fellowship of Southern Writers, and others. He lives with his wife in Syracuse and teaches at Syracuse University.

Christine Kitano is the author of two collections of poetry, Birds of Paradise (Lynx House Press) and Sky Country (BOA Editions), which won the Central New York Book Award and was a finalist for the Paterson Poetry Prize. She is an associate professor at Ithaca College where she teaches courses in creative writing, poetry, and Asian American literature. She is co-editor of the forthcoming They Rise Like a Wave, an anthology of Asian American women and non-binary poets. In January 2021, she was named Tompkins County Poet Laureate.

Dana Levin is the author of four collections of poetry, most recently Banana Palace (2016), which was a finalist for the Rilke Prize. Her first book, In the Surgical Theatre, was chosen by Louise Glück for the 1999 American Poetry Review/Honickman First Book Prize and went on to receive numerous honors, including the 2003 PEN/Osterweil Award. Copper Canyon Press brought out her second book, Wedding Day, in 2005, and in 2011 Sky Burial, which The New Yorker called “utterly her own and utterly riveting.” Sky Burial was noted for 2011 year-end honors by The New Yorker, the San Francisco Chronicle, Coldfront, and Library Journal. Levin’s poetry and essays have appeared in many anthologies and magazines, including Best American Poetry, The New York Times, Los Angeles Review of Books, Boston Review, The American Poetry Review, Poetry, and The Paris Review. Her fellowships and awards include those from the National Endowment for the Arts, PEN, the Witter Bynner Foundation and the Library of Congress, as well as from the Lannan, Rona Jaffe, Whiting and Guggenheim Foundations. Levin currently serves as Distinguished Writer in Residence at Maryville University in St. Louis, where she lives. Her fifth book, Now Do You Know Where You Are, will be published by Copper Canyon in Spring 2022.

Maurice Manning is the author of seven books of poetry, most recently, Railsplitter. His first book was selected for the Yale Series of Younger Poets, and his fourth book was a finalist for the Pulitzer prize. A Guggenheim Fellow, Manning is professor of English and writer-in-residence at Transylvania University in Lexington, KY. He lives on a small farm with his family in Kentucky.

Matthew Olzmann is the author of two collections of poems, Mezzanines, which was selected for the Kundiman Prize, and Contradictions in the Design, both from Alice James Books. A third collection, Constellation Route, will be released in January 2022. He’s received fellowships from Kundiman and the Kresge Arts Foundation. His writing appears or is forthcoming in Best American Poetry, Kenyon Review, New England Review, Brevity, Southern Review and elsewhere. Previously, he’s taught in the undergraduate writing program at Warren Wilson College and at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He lives in Vermont and teaches at Dartmouth College.

Martha Rhodes is the author of five collections of poetry: At the Gate (1995, Provincetown Arts), Perfect Disappearance (2000, winner of the Green Rose Prize, New Issues Press), Mother Quiet (2004, Zoo Press / University of Nebraska) The Beds (2012, Autumn House), and The Thin Wall (2017, University of Pittsburgh Press). She teaches at Sarah Lawrence College and the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College. She is the director of Four Way Books in New York City, publishers of poetry and fiction.