Debra Allbery received her MFA from the University of Iowa and her MA from the University of Virginia. Her first collection of poetry, Walking Distance, won the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize and was published by the University of Pittsburgh Press. Her collection, Fimbul-Winter, was published by Four Way Books in October 2010 and won the Grub Street National Book Prize in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry, Yale Review, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, New England Review, The Nation, FIELD, TriQuarterly, and elsewhere. She has twice received fellowships from the NEA; other awards include the “Discovery”/The Nation Award, a Hawthornden fellowship, and two grants from the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts. She has taught writing and literature at Phillips Exeter Academy, Interlochen Arts Academy, Randolph College, Dickinson College, and the University of Michigan. Deb first taught in the Program in 1995; she became the director in June 2009.

Marianne Boruch has published ten collections of poems including The Book of Hours (2011), Cadaver, Speak (2014), and Eventually One Dreams the Real Thing (2016), and most recently The Anti-Grief (2019) all from Copper Canyon Press. Her prose includes a memoir, The Glimpse Traveler (Indiana, 2011)and three essay collections, Poetry’s Old Air (Michigan’s “Poets on Poetry” series, 1993), In the Blue Pharmacy (Trinity, 2005), and The Little Death of Self (again that Michigan series, 2017).  Her poems and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, Paris Review, The Nation, Poetry London, American Poetry Review, Narrative, The London Review of Books, Field, Poetry, The New York Review of Books and elsewhere, and she’s been given the Kingsley-Tufts Poetry Award for The Book of Hours, four Pushcart Prizes, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center, as well as stints as artist-in-residence at two national parks, Isle Royale and Denali. She was a Fulbright/visiting professor in the UK at the University of Edinburgh in 2012, and in 2019, a Senior Fulbright Research Scholar at the University of Canberra in Australia, closely observing the astonishing wildlife there. Having taught for the last 34 years at Purdue University, she has now gone rogue and emeritus.

Gabrielle Calvocoressi is the author of The Last Time I Saw Amelia EarhartApocalyptic Swing, which was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and Rocket Fantastic. She is the recipient of numerous grants and fellowships including a Stegner Fellowship and Jones Lectureship from Stanford University, a Rona Jaffe Woman Writers Award, and residences from Civitella di Ranieri and the Lannan Foundation. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in American Poetry ReviewPloughsharesThe New York TimesBoston Review and New England Review, among others. She is Senior Poetry Editor at Los Angeles Review of Books and Founder and Senior Curator at Voluble, a forthcoming channel from Los Angeles Review of Books. She teaches in the Warren Wilson Program for Writers and at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She makes new economies with those who wish to. She tweets at @rocketfantastic and is on Instagram as gabbat. She is at work on a memoir entitled The Year I Didn’t Kill Myself.

Daisy Fried is the author of four books of poetry: The Year the City Emptied, Women’s Poetry: Poems and AdviceMy Brother is Getting Arrested Again, and She Didn’t Mean to Do It. She has been awarded Guggenheim, Hodder and Pew Fellowships. An occasional poetry critic for the New York Times, Poetry Foundation and elsewhere; poetry editor for the journal Scoundrel Time; and a member of the faculty of the BFA Program in Creative Writing at University of the Arts. She lives in Philadelphia.

Jennifer Grotz is the author of three books of poetry and volumes of translations of Patrice de la Tour du Pin and Jerzy Ficowski.  She is a professor at the U. of Rochester, directs the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and has been on our faculty since 2006.

A. Van Jordan is the author of four books of poetry, most recently The Cineaste. Recipient of a Pushcart Prize and a Lannan Poetry Award, he received his MFA from the Program in 1998 and has been on its faculty since 2004.

Sally Keith’s fourth collection of poetry, River House was recently published by Milkweed Editions; she is the author of The Fact of the Matter (Milkweed 2012) and two previous collections of poetry, Design, winner of the 2000 Colorado Prize for Poetry, and Dwelling Song (UGA 2004).  She has published poems in a variety of literary journals, including Gettysburg Review, New England Review, A Public Space, Black Clock and Literary Imagination.  Recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize and recent fellowships at Virginia Center for Creative Arts, UCROSS Foundation and Fundación Valparaíso, she is a member of the MFA Faculty at George Mason University and lives in Washington DC.

Matthew Olzmann is the author of three collections of poems, Mezzanines, which was selected for the Kundiman Prize, Contradictions in the Design, and Constellation Route, all from Alice James Books.  He’s received fellowships from Kundiman and the Kresge Arts Foundation.  His writing appears or is forthcoming in Best American Poetry, Kenyon Review, New England Review, Brevity, Southern Review and elsewhere.  Previously, he’s taught in the undergraduate writing program at Warren Wilson College and at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  He lives in New Hampshire and teaches at Dartmouth College.

A 2020 Guggenheim Fellow, Brian Teare is the author of eight chapbooks and six critically acclaimed books, including Companion Grasses, a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Award, and Doomstead Days, winner of the Four Quartets Prize and a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle, Kingsley Tufts, and Lambda Literary Awards. His most recent publication is the 2022 Nightboat reissue of The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven; his seventh book, Poem Bitten by a Man, is forthcoming in the fall of 2023. His honors include Lambda Literary and Publishing Triangle Awards, and fellowships from the NEA, the Pew Foundation, the American Antiquarian Society, the Headlands Center for the Arts, the Vermont Studio Center, and the MacDowell Colony. After over a decade of teaching and writing in the San Francisco Bay Area, and eight years in Philadelphia, he’s now an Associate Professor of Poetry at the University of Virginia. An editorial board member of Poetry Daily, he lives in Charlottesville, where he makes books by hand for his micropress, Albion Books.

Daniel Tobin is the author of eight books of poems, Where the World is Made (Middlebury College Press, 1999), Double Life (Louisiana State University Press, 2004), The Narrows (Four Way Books, 2005), Second Things (Four Way Books, 2008), Belated Heavens (Four Way Books, 2010), The Net (Four Way Books, 2014), From Nothing (Four Way Books, 2016), and Blood Labors (Four Way Books, 2018), which the New York Times named one of the Best Poetry Books of the year.  His suite of versions of poems from the German of Paul Celan, The Stone in the Air, also appeared in 2018. He is the author of the critical studies Awake in America (University of Notre Dame Press, 2011), Passage to the Center: Imagination and the Sacred in the Poetry of Seamus Heaney (University of Kentucky Press, 1999), and On Serious Earth (Little Island Press, 2018), as well as the editor of The Book of Irish American Poetry from the Eighteenth Century to the Present (University of Notre Dame Press, 2007), Selected Early Poems of Lola Ridge (Quale, 2007), Poet’s Work, Poet’s Play: Essays on the Practice and the Arts (University of Michigan Press2008, with Pimone Triplett), and To the Many: Collected Early Works of Lola Ridge (Little Island, 2018), which received a Special Commendation from the Poetry Society (U.K.)  Among his awards are the “The Discovery/The Nation Award,” The Robert Penn Warren Award, the Robert Frost Fellowship, the Katherine Bakeless Nason Prize, the Massachusetts Book Award in Poetry, the Julia Ward Howe Prize, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation.