Debra Allbery received her MFA from the University of Iowa and her MA from the University of Virginia. Her first collection of poetry, Walking Distance, won the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize and was published by the University of Pittsburgh Press. Her collection, Fimbul-Winter, was published by Four Way Books in October 2010 and won the Grub Street National Book Prize in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry, Yale Review, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, New England Review, The Nation, FIELD, TriQuarterly, and elsewhere. She has twice received fellowships from the NEA; other awards include the “Discovery”/The Nation Award, a Hawthornden fellowship, and two grants from the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts. She has taught writing and literature at Phillips Exeter Academy, Interlochen Arts Academy, Randolph College, Dickinson College, and the University of Michigan. Deb first taught in the Program in 1995; she became the director in June 2009.

Sally Ball is the author of three collections of poems, Hold Sway, Wreck Me and Annus Mirabilis. She has published essays and reviews in Lithub, NOR, Pleiades, The Review of Contemporary Fiction, The Volta, and elsewhere. Her poems have appeared in The American Poetry Review, Bennington Review, Boston Review (Forum 3), Harvard Review, Ploughshares, Tin House, Yale Review, and other magazines, as well as online at The Awl, Narrative, and Slate, and in The Best American Poetry anthology. Professor of English and director of creative writing at Arizona State University, Ball is also the associate director of Four Way Books. She has been with the press for 26 of its 30 years. She has received fellowships from the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, CAMAC Centre d’Art, and elsewhere. Her long poem HOLD has been made into an award-winning large-format artist’s book by the Czech printmaker Jan Vičar (2018); HOLD has been exhibited across Europe, in Japan, and in the US, and it will be the subject of an exhibition at the Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague this summer, sponsored the Czech Ministry of the Environment, as part of the handover of the EU presidency.

Oliver Baez Bendorf collaborates with language to imagine new possibilities for gender and nature. He’s received fellowships from the NEA, Vermont Studio Center, CantoMundo, and the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, and The Publishing Triangle’s Betty Berzon Award. His first book of poetry, The Spectral Wilderness, was selected by Mark Doty for the Stan and Tom Wick Poetry Prize and published by Kent State University Press. His second book, Advantages of Being Evergreen, won the Open Book Prize from Cleveland State University Poetry Center. His writing has appeared in, or is forthcoming from, Best American Poetry 2022, American Poetry Review, Denver Quarterly, The Nation, New England Review, Orion, POETRY Magazine, Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics, and elsewhere. Previously he’s taught in the undergraduate creative writing programs at University of Wisconsin-Madison and Kalamazoo College. He lives with his partner and rabbit in the Pacific Northwest.

CM Burroughs is Associate Professor of Poetry at Columbia College Chicago. She is the author of The Vital System (Tupelo Press, 2012) and Master Suffering (Tupelo Press, 2021) which was longlisted for the National Book Award and is a finalist for both the LA Times Book Award and Lambda Book Award. Burroughs has been awarded fellowships and grants from Yaddo, the MacDowell Colony, Djerassi Foundation, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and Cave Canem Foundation. She has received commissions from the Studio Museum of Harlem and the Warhol Museum to create poetry in response to art installations. Burroughs’ poetry has appeared in journals and anthologies including Poetry magazine, CallaloojubilatPloughsharesVOLT,

Best American Experimental Writing Anthology, and The Golden Shovel Anthology: New Poems Honoring Gwendolyn Brooks.

Daisy Fried is the author of four books of poetry: The Year the City Emptied, Women’s Poetry: Poems and AdviceMy Brother is Getting Arrested Again, and She Didn’t Mean to Do It. She has been awarded Guggenheim, Hodder and Pew Fellowships. An occasional poetry critic for the New York Times, Poetry Foundation and elsewhere; poetry editor for the journal Scoundrel Time; and a member of the faculty of the BFA Program in Creative Writing at University of the Arts. She lives in Philadelphia.

Christine Kitano is the author of two collections of poetry, Birds of Paradise (Lynx House Press) and Sky Country (BOA Editions), which won the Central New York Book Award and was a finalist for the Paterson Poetry Prize. She is an associate professor at Ithaca College where she teaches courses in creative writing, poetry, and Asian American literature. She is co-editor of the forthcoming They Rise Like a Wave, an anthology of Asian American women and non-binary poets. In January 2021, she was named Tompkins County Poet Laureate.

Maurice Manning is the author of seven books of poetry, most recently, Railsplitter.  His first book was selected for the Yale Series of Younger Poets, and his fourth book was a finalist for the Pulitzer prize.  A Guggenheim Fellow, Manning is professor of English and writer-in-residence at Transylvania University in Lexington, KY. He lives on a small farm with his family in Kentucky.

Matthew Olzmann is the author of three collections of poems, Mezzanines, which was selected for the Kundiman Prize, Contradictions in the Design, and Constellation Route, all from Alice James Books.  He’s received fellowships from Kundiman and the Kresge Arts Foundation.  His writing appears or is forthcoming in Best American Poetry, Kenyon Review, New England Review, Brevity, Southern Review and elsewhere.  Previously, he’s taught in the undergraduate writing program at Warren Wilson College and at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  He lives in New Hampshire and teaches at Dartmouth College.

Jason Schneiderman is the author of four books of poems: Hold Me Tight (Red Hen Press 2020) Primary Source (Red Hen Press 2016), winner of the Benjamin Saltman Prize; Striking Surface (Ashland Poetry Press 2010), winner of the Richard Snyder Prize, and Sublimation Point (Four Way Books 2004), a Stahlecker Selection. He edited the anthology Queer: A Reader for Writers (Oxford University Press 2016).  His poetry and essays have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies, including American Poetry Review, The Best American Poetry, Poetry London, Grand Street, The Penguin Book of the Sonnet, Story Quarterly, and Tin House. He has received fellowships and awards from Yaddo, The Fine Arts Work Center, The Fulbright Foundation, and the Poetry Society of America. A longtime co-host of the podcast Painted Bride Quarterly Slush Pile, he is (as of August) Professor of English at the Borough of Manhattan Community College and teaches in the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.

Alan Williamson recently retired from the University of California at Davis. He has also taught at Harvard, the University of Virginia, and Brandeis. His books of poems are Presence, The Muse of Distance, Love and the Soul, Res Publica, The Pattern More Complicated: New and Selected Poems and Franciscan Notes. He has also published five critical books:  Introspection and Contemporary Poetry; Pity the Monsters: The Political Vision of Robert Lowell; Eloquence and Mere Life;  Almost a Girl: Male Writers and Female Identification, and Westernness:  A Meditation.  He has done a number of translations from the Italian, including The Living Theatre:  Selected Poems of Bianca Tarozzi, co-translated with Jeanne Foster.  He has received grants from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation.